I know the idea of creating a freebie can be stressful (see my post on creating the perfect freebie for more on this!), but it doesn’t have to be all about a freebie or lead magnet. Consider the kind of content you can offer on a weekly or monthly basis that will benefit your readers. Maybe that’s resources or info. Maybe that’s entertainment or encouragement. Don’t let your email come last! Your subscribers are your VIPS, remember? Give them your BEST.


“The depth of information you will find in Jennifer's courses is beyond comparison! Jennifer is easy to listen to, very professional, and has a teaching style that makes anyone feel like they can learn! I've taken many courses and this is the first one that feels like everything is spelled out for me in an easy to understand format. She makes learning enjoyable and effective!”
Thanks for weighing in Debbie. Completely agree, popups do annoy some people, and I can appreciate why. Like banner blindness, popup blindness is becoming more of a “thing” now too. But, they do work. And, I’ve found the more aggressive you are with them, the higher the conversion rate. Thrive Leads is the tool I use to build my email list https://www.robbierichards.com/recommended-tools/. Well worth a mention!

In this video Sean Cannell from Think Media shares 5 tips on how to use YouTube to generate leads. If you are curious about how to build an email list or how to build an email list fast. Is it possible to build a email list for free? Sean says "yes," and in this video you'll learn how how to build an email list from scratch. People often wonder how to build a large email list and audience from scratch so they research email list building and email list building strategies. So check out this email list building tutorial and these email list building tips and strategic list building strategies!
Visitors to your website might overlook the call to sign up that you have at the top of every page, but it’s harder to ignore a lightbox or pop-up. Scroll boxes pop up on visitors’ screens after they’ve scrolled down a certain length of the page. The box encourages them to sign up for your email list. They can be effective for encouraging a user who’s already shown interest in your content (by staying on the page long enough to scroll) to sign up for your email list.

Sponsor a video contest in which customers create a one-minute video about why they like your business, products or services. Ask them to send the videos to you and post them to your Facebook page. Invite visitors to vote on which video should win a cash or merchandise prize. Include an email opt-in on your Facebook page. Be sure to follow Facebook’s rules regarding contests.
With the right set of tools, you can build your list cost-efficiently and ensure that it’s relevant, filled with people who have expressed a genuine interest towards your brand. Building an email list will take some time, but it will grow over time and has the potential to give you a lot of business in the long run. Hope you give these tools a spin and let us know how it goes - we’d love to hear your feedback.
Your blog provides a great way to build a personal relationship with customers and prospects — and to gather their email addresses. Consistently end blogs with a call to action that encourages readers to sign up for your email messages. Require blog visitors to provide an email list in order to leave comments, and set it up so that they have to actively opt out if they don’t want their email address included on your mailing list.
So at the end of that third month (January 2017), I began my mailing list. And I immediately began learning HOW to build a mailing list, because it's not as simple as slapping up a "subscribe to me" form on your blog. (Tried that, didn't work.) I researched, tested, and experimented. When I found something that worked, I did more and more of it. I continuously refined and focused until I had my own little formula that was working!

Providing alternatives like these is an effective way to grow a nice big list of subscribers that are targeted to you and what you have to offer them. They are more likely to also be responsive to your website content through the comments section.  This captive audience is worth gold to you, so treat it well. When you market to them, they are more than likely to receive it well. 
The content that goes to your email list should be a step above any other content you’re giving. The reason is that these are people who have expressed interest in you and your offerings already, or who have bought from you. Therefore, the content should be more targeted based on how they got on the list, and more valuable since you know who you’re creating it for and why.

Internet audience is fast moving, and they tend to go from one to another in a fraction of a second. So every aspect of your user interface counts when you are trying to get their attention. Having a beautifully designed web page will not always lead to the fact that you’ll be having lots of visitors to your website who would come back again and again.
“The depth of information you will find in Jennifer's courses is beyond comparison! Jennifer is easy to listen to, very professional, and has a teaching style that makes anyone feel like they can learn! I've taken many courses and this is the first one that feels like everything is spelled out for me in an easy to understand format. She makes learning enjoyable and effective!”

So at the end of that third month (January 2017), I began my mailing list. And I immediately began learning HOW to build a mailing list, because it's not as simple as slapping up a "subscribe to me" form on your blog. (Tried that, didn't work.) I researched, tested, and experimented. When I found something that worked, I did more and more of it. I continuously refined and focused until I had my own little formula that was working!
I’ll never forget the fun we had at those NFL celebrations at Regent Street in London, a couple of years back. My sister and I took part in a couple of games, one of which required yelling some American Football words at the top of our voices, and our mum was certain we were going to nail this. Sure this sounds supportive, but our mum’s focus was on “yelling”. Joke’s on her, we failed miserably (…we only caught “quarterback” out of all the words).
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