Shorter copy is powerful. 200-300 words or less is a good rule of thumb if you aren’t using a full blog post, especially if you are sending more than one email a week. We have used this idea of using only part of a blog post in our own emails, making sure that the introductory copy was sufficient to let the reader know exactly what the post was about. Entice without tricking, in other words.
A useful footer. Below your main content is the footer of your email. It should contain a clear and simple way for your reader to unsubscribe, as required by the CAN-SPAM Act. Mention why they are getting the email (they signed up), and how to contact you. Email apps often take care of this for you, but just be sure it is included. The footer area is where you could do “self-advertising” if you wanted to. Keep it simple, if you choose to do it, preferably just one or two “ads” or links.
Sponsor a video contest in which customers create a one-minute video about why they like your business, products or services. Ask them to send the videos to you and post them to your Facebook page. Invite visitors to vote on which video should win a cash or merchandise prize. Include an email opt-in on your Facebook page. Be sure to follow Facebook’s rules regarding contests.
"Before I came across Rapid List Building I was shooting blindly in the dark just hoping and praying that what I was doing would work. Now I have a roadmap to grow my list. No more hoping, guessing, and wasting time. I finally feel confident and in control. And the best part...I'm now adding 100+ new subscribers to my email list every day. I'm on track to double my revenue this year."
The first step in creating compelling content is having a clear picture of who you’re writing for. For example, if your business revolves around selling digital design solutions, you have to know what sort of people want design solutions, are they college students or small businesses? Do they want a quick fix or are they looking for permanent solutions? Where do they live? What sort of income do they have?

Also, don’t be afraid of “scaring” people off by constantly asking for their email. Popovers are a great way to grow your email list, but many small businesses are afraid to implement them because of their bias perception. SumoMe analyzed 390 million pop-ups over a 1-month span and concluded that popovers, on average, convert emails at a rate of roughly 1.06%. While this might not seem like a high number, it’s still 1 out of 100 visitors and is one more lead for your sales funnel. You can increase your chances of converting with popovers by avoiding boring calls-to-action like “Sign up for our newsletter.”
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But your money could also be spent on advertising your product to a community – not a random set of people For example, John Lee Dumas runs a podcast called Entrepreneur on Fire. If you have a great product that will make an entrepreneur’s life easy, you can hit him up there. His episodes cover all things entrepreneurial and he boasts a loyal audience. His September listens totaled more than 1 million. John even recently published a useful blog post about podcast sponsorships.
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