High-traffic posts: High-traffic posts are the posts that people are reading, and indicate a topic they are interested in. You could create an email autoresponder out of these specific posts, or use them as a guide on what people want to read about. An added bonus, once you know which posts get the traffic, is that you can promote your email autoresponder in those actual blog posts and target a specific audience.
People like more choices, so consider creating subscription levels that let people sign up to receive content that’s relevant to them. For example, if you sell widgets and tax advice, provide three options on your opt-in form that allow users to sign up to receive info about widgets, info about tax advice or both. Further customize by allowing them to designate how frequently they’d like to hear from you — weekly, monthly or only when something really special is going on. People may be more likely to sign up for your email list if they have some control over the content they’ll receive.
Don’t read everything at once. There is a lot of great information in here, but it’s easy to feel overwhelmed after reading through all of the content in one sitting. Instead, take incremental steps. For example, if you want to find out where or how to ask people for their emails on your site, read the content in chapter 2. Implement it, then come back later for the next steps.

Cathy is the Woodpecker blog’s creator & chief contributor. She used to spend lots of time contacting prospects, especially via email. One of the few people on Earth who read crappy cold emails from start to end and analyze them – for purely educational purposes. Taking care of this blog, reporting Woodpecker’s journey on the pursuit of happy openings, successful closures and all the new skills we acquire in between.


Shorter email course. We have several short email autoresponders, and we use their brevity as part of the selling point. A short email course is the perfect answer to a reader who doesn’t want to be bothered too much, and who doesn’t want to commit to a long session of emails. A short email course works great for a tightly planned topic with a logical course outline, and a distinct beginning and end. With a shorter email course, people are more readily aware of previous content, and continuity and structure are important. A shorter course is also easier for a new blogger to get started with.
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Soon after this, I developed and launched my first product, a crafters' design course for my DIY & Craft Blog. I promoted my course to my mailing list, and only my mailing list, as a test. It was my first launch and I admit I was a little nervous! But the launch to my mailing list, which was now 13,000 subscribers strong, was a huge success and I earned over $12,000 just from that launch ... all thanks to my mailing list. Without that list, I probably would have been lucky to make a few hundred bucks and wasted a whole lot of effort.

Brian. You talk about how all these variables matter in getting this article to rank #1 for “list building” and how competitors have way more links than you, but then you also consider your DA and your PA together, you have almost the highest score out of the top 10 rankings; and when you consider you are more topical authority, then that explains why Hugpages (all purpose site) is not ranking higher. Maybe its not all as complicated as you suggest.
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