Headline-quality subject lines. The same rules that apply to creating great headlines apply to your email subject line. It has the burden of getting your reader to decide to open the email and not delete it. Ask readers a question directly, hint that you have a solution to a problem, or suggest there is something they don’t know and ought to. MailChimp offers a free tool that lets you test your subject lines out against all of the data they’ve collected on emails that get great open rates.
Also, don’t be afraid of “scaring” people off by constantly asking for their email. Popovers are a great way to grow your email list, but many small businesses are afraid to implement them because of their bias perception. SumoMe analyzed 390 million pop-ups over a 1-month span and concluded that popovers, on average, convert emails at a rate of roughly 1.06%. While this might not seem like a high number, it’s still 1 out of 100 visitors and is one more lead for your sales funnel. You can increase your chances of converting with popovers by avoiding boring calls-to-action like “Sign up for our newsletter.”

iii) List of questions in one email without the answers. Then, you can set up an Email Automation for those who click through your newsletter, to receive another email afterwards, with the answers to the challenges. (Because, on Moosend’s platform, email automation sequences only “cost” you one credit per subscriber, regardless of the emails in the sequence.)

Shorter copy is powerful. 200-300 words or less is a good rule of thumb if you aren’t using a full blog post, especially if you are sending more than one email a week. We have used this idea of using only part of a blog post in our own emails, making sure that the introductory copy was sufficient to let the reader know exactly what the post was about. Entice without tricking, in other words.


I’ll never forget the fun we had at those NFL celebrations at Regent Street in London, a couple of years back. My sister and I took part in a couple of games, one of which required yelling some American Football words at the top of our voices, and our mum was certain we were going to nail this. Sure this sounds supportive, but our mum’s focus was on “yelling”. Joke’s on her, we failed miserably (…we only caught “quarterback” out of all the words).
Liz is a professional copywriter and editor who creates successful and popular blog posts, landing pages, and email automation campaigns for AWeber, one of the world’s leading email marketing and automation platforms. Over the past 5 years, she’s sent hundreds of emails to millions of subscribers. She’s constantly scouring the email data of the “best of the best,” and she knows what works and what doesn’t when it comes to growing your business with the help of email.

Basically, it’s a single page site where you share valuable, relevant, and meaningful information in exchange for an email address. It could be anything from landscape photography tips and tricks, low-budget travel tips, monthly entertainment newsletter, free ebook, whitepaper, blogger list… whatever it is your target audience wants and needs in exchange for their email.
Using an autoresponder to set up your email opt-in form also gives you the option of setting up a double or single opt-in. Again, the double opt-in is where your new subscriber must confirm his/her email address. This simple option can show up as either an email asking the subscriber to confirm their subscription or as a CAPTCHA code that pops up. Again, this goes a long way towards weeding out fake emails.
When you meet people face to face for any reason, ask for their business card. Offer yours. Set a glass bowl on the counter in your store or the reception desk in your office, and ask visitors to drop their cards in it. Offer some incentive to do so — a free product or service, gift card, etc. Use your own business cards to further drum up emails; add an offer on the back of your card that encourages people to sign up to receive your emails.
Brian , your every post is like a book, I always read your post and try to find a few questions to ask .. but to be honest your posts are that comprehensive that, I don’t find a question to ask because you left nothing unexplained ! I wonder how long you take to prepare a post like this, I probably would take a whole year ! 🙂 Good luck Brian. you are a magician of IM strategies.
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